Europe gets in the game with 5G deployments

Europe gets in the game with 5G deployments

To date the majority of conversation around 5G mobile network deployments has been in the U.S., as once again Verizon and AT&T battle over whose network will be the best. In the past, the eurozone has blazed the next generation of mobile technology due in part to both Ericsson and Nokia being housed there.

But that is about to change as several mobile operators in the eurozone fire their own 5G cannons with initial network deployments and data plans. While the 5G networks will be a work in progress for some time, the data plans will be something to watch as the carriers balance winning 5G subscribers vs. recouping the spectrum acquisition as well as network buildout costs.

Given the growing pervasiveness of unlimited data plans, we’ll be looking to see how network operators price their 5G offerings, and which solutions stick. As this aspect of our Digital Infrastructure investing theme gets built out, our suspicion is the near unquenchable thirst for data consumption that is part of our Digital Lifestyle investing theme will go swallow up 5G data speeds without missing a beat.

Europe may have lagged behind the United States and South Korea in early 5G network launches due to regulatory hurdles, but top carriers are now making up for lost time with aggressive moves across the continent. In Germany, Deutsche Telekom unexpectedly commenced commercial 5G service in two cities today, while rival Vodafone announced unlimited 4G/5G service plans for the United Kingdom, including 5G roaming across the U.K., Germany, Italy, and Spain.

In Deutsche Telekom’s case, the carrier has opted to open 5G test networks in Berlin and Bonn to consumers today, with a promise to add four more cities in 2019, and cover 20 by the end of 2020.

The move comes only weeks after the carrier spent $2.45 billion in a German 5G spectrum auction and a year after it first began to publicly complain about the high costs of 5G deployment — the reason its unlimited 5G plan will cost €85 ($96) per month with voice service, or €75 ($85) monthly for hotspot-only data service. Initial service is being focused on dense metropolitan areas, but the carrier plans to “eliminate white spots in rural areas” and build 5G networks for campuses, amongst other expansions of its coverage.

Meanwhile, Vodafone has built upon its earlier promise to launch 5G on July 3, becoming the first U.K. operator to promise unlimited 4G and 5G data plans. For the first week of service, Vodafone is offering 5G along with data-capped plans, but starting July 10 the carrier will offer three unlimited data plans at prices from £23 to £30, differentiated by speed. The lowest-end plan, Vodafone Unlimited Lite, will be capped at a meager 2Mbps, while a £26 Unlimited plan will offer 10Mbps speeds, and the high-end Unlimited Max plan will hit “speeds as fast as the device and the network will allow,” peaking at 100 times faster than its current LTE network.

“[W]ith 5G, the demand for data is only set to increase,” explained Vodafone UK CEO Nick Jeffery. “That is why we want to remove the limits on data, so that customers can unlock the full potential of 5G and we can really propel the U.K. into the digital age. By offering unlimited plans to our consumer and business customers, we will revolutionize the market.”

Source: Deutsche Telekom debuts 5G in Germany as Vodafone UK offers unlimited plans

Hospitals push device makers to improve security following cyberattacks 

Hospitals push device makers to improve security following cyberattacks 

As the kinds of cyber attacks companies and other businesses are experiencing expand, we are seeing the actual victims, as well as potential ones of these attacks, step up their efforts to protect themselves. In hospitals, one of the areas of focus is internet connected equipment, but we can see how this will quickly spill over to the burgeoning Internet of Things and larger 5G markets, igniting a new round of demand for companies that fall within the parameters of our Safety & Security investing theme.

Hospitals are pushing medical-device makers to improve cyber defenses of their internet-connected infusion pumps, biopsy imaging tables and other health-care products as reports of attacks rise.

Rattled by recent global cyberattacks, U.S. hospitals are conducting tests to detect weaknesses in specific devices, and asking manufacturers to reveal the proprietary software running the products in order to identify vulnerabilities. In some cases, hospitals have canceled orders and rejected bids for devices that lacked safety features.

Hospitals, after a decade of racing to wire up their medical records and an explosion of internet-connected medical devices, are growing more aggressive with technology suppliers amid pressure to better defend against incursions that could threaten patients and cause costly disruptions. Credit-rating agency Moody’s Investors Service in February ranked hospitals as one of the sectors most vulnerable to cyberattacks.

In stepping up their efforts, hospitals have gone beyond building firewalls and taking other actions to shield their own networks—they have moved into demanding information like the software running devices that manufacturers have long considered proprietary. The requests have generated tensions between the sides.

Source: Rattled by Cyberattacks, Hospitals Push Device Makers to Improve Security – WSJ

The FCC is already planning for  terahertz wireless data after 5G

The FCC is already planning for terahertz wireless data after 5G

We are only starting to see commercial deployment of 5G mobile technology, but efforts are already underway for the next evolution of mobile connectivity. Here at Tematica, we’ve been saying there will be another “G” after 5G, much the way there was a 4G after 3G and 2G. With applications still being realized for 4G LTE and new ones on the way, including IoT and autonomous car communication/connectivity, with 5G as well as significantly faster data speeds, it’s fair to say terahertz wireless data will lead to more Disruptive Innovation and another round of Digital Infrastructure buildout

Never mind the possibilities opened up by millimeter wave 5G and other many-gigahertz technologies — the FCC is already thinking about the next generation beyond that. The Commission has voted unanimously in favor of creating a category of experimental licenses that range from 95GHz to a whopping 3THz — effectively, the limits of usable wireless technology. The Spectrum Horizons order would let companies experiment with this ultra-high frequency tech for as long as 10 years, and would make it easier for them to sell real-world products while they’re in that test phase.

The measure also sets aside 21.2GHz of spectrum to share for unlicensed devices. The airwaves in question were chosen to minimize possible interference with current “governmental and scientific” uses in those areas, such as space science.

These frequencies could lead to extremely fast wireless network data, advanced imaging and very fine-grained sensors, among other purposes. However, you might not want to get your hopes up for a cellphone with terahertz 6G any time soon. Even more so than with millimeter waves, the terahertz range would be limited by short ranges and difficulty penetrating objects. That’s what the experiments are for, though — it could establish uses that aren’t even on the radar yet.

Source: FCC clears path for terahertz wireless data

Doubling Down on Digital Infrastructure Thematic Leader

Doubling Down on Digital Infrastructure Thematic Leader

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Adding two Middle-class Squeeze call option positions ahead of earnings this week

Adding two Middle-class Squeeze call option positions ahead of earnings this week

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Verizon’s 5G in 30 US cities by end of 2019

Verizon’s 5G in 30 US cities by end of 2019

As we enter Mobile World Congress 2019, arguably the mobile event of the year, 5G network and device launch details are coming into greater focus. Verizon is taking the early lead in the US staking out 5G to 30 cities in the US by the end of 2019. Of course, 30 cities is hardly national coverage, which means a continued deployment for this aspect of our Digital Infrastructure investing theme well into 2020 at least for the US if not into 2021. Factor in the competitive response from AT&T and the soon to be combined T-Mobile USA and Sprint, and it means the likely tipping point for 5G is looking increasingly like the second half of 2020. From an iPhone perspective, even though Samsung and Motorola have announced they will have devices ready by mid-2019,  this 5G network timetable means we should not be expecting any 5G news from Apple this year, but rather its annual iPhone event in September-October of 2020.

Verizon on Thursday said it’s working on deploying 5G to some extent in 30 U.S. cities by the end of 2019, another hint that the technology won’t appear in iPhones until 2020.

The first parts of Verizon’s 5G network should be up by mid-2019 though, since the carrier is the exclusive launch partner for the Samsung Galaxy S10 5G.

AT&T and T-Mobile are also working on 5G deployments. Neither carrier is expected to get very far by the end of 2019 however, owing to partly to lags in equipment. There are also relatively few 5G-ready devices on the market, offering little incentive to speed up.

Multiple reports have pointed to Apple waiting until 2020 to ship 5G-capable iPhones. The company’s preferred modem maker, Intel, is unlikely to have a 5G chip ready until that timeframe.

Source: Verizon says 5G coming to 30 US cities by end of 2019

FCC targets regulatory reform to goose supply of 5G spectrum

FCC targets regulatory reform to goose supply of 5G spectrum

New technologies have the potential to either upend the existing playing field or bring about new value propositions that render past business models passe. One of those that is expected to usher in a wider array of connectivity with speeds that match existing cable broadband speeds is 5G. Often times, these new technologies take time, usually more time than expected, to be commercialized. Yet, there are many signposts that confirm their move from concept to beta to pre-market launch to commercialization. With mobile technologies, this means have the proper infrastructure in place, capable chipsets and devices available and sufficient radio airwaves (also known as spectrum). Of the three, available spectrum is the most scarce, and it has been known to foster certain M&A activity like the marriage of Sprint and Nextel and AT&T’s $1.6 billion purchase of Straight Path last year as well as its more recent comments that it will “continue to invest significant capital in obtaining additional spectrum to meet its long-term needs.” 

One potential risk is the lack of available spectrum inhibits the expected rollout and new business models expected by 5G that would be a boon for economic growth as well as revenue and profits. For that reason, the FCC is examining spectrum alternatives and regulatory reforms that it could boost the spectrum supply as well as improve future mobile network capacity. In other words, allow for the creative destruction tailwind that 5G will bring as part of our Disruptive Innovators investing theme.

 

The Federal Communications Commission is trying to pave a smoother road to our 5G future. The government agency plans to consider freeing up more radio airwaves for use in 5G networks in its next monthly meeting, FCC Chairman Ajit Pai said in a statement. The commission will look to the 3.5 gigahertz spectrum band as a potential source of radio airwaves. While not the super high-frequency spectrum commonly talked about when looking at 5G networks, 3.5 Ghz has the potential to carry more capacity and speed than lower frequency spectrum used in many of today’s networks. T

he agency will also look at freeing up the use of 6 Ghz band of unlicensed spectrum for use to bolster Wi-Fi coverage. Wi-Fi runs on two existing frequecies, 2.4 Ghz and 5 Ghz, and adding a new band could alleviate congestion. Pai said the agency would also look at removing regulations on rural carriers, which he said would let them invest in their networks.

Source: FCC’s Ajit Pai plans to free up spectrum for 5G, Wi-Fi coverage – CNET