Unilever targets $1.2 billion sales target for meat and dairy alternatives but it’s simply not good enough

Unilever targets $1.2 billion sales target for meat and dairy alternatives but it’s simply not good enough

The plant-based meat market is expected to grow enormously in the coming years given the shift in consumer preferences for sustainable. Barclays predicting the market will grow by more than 1,000% over the next 10 years to reach $140 billion by 2029. It comes as no surprise to us then that companies would look to capture that tailwind to drive revenues, profits and cash flow.

Recently Unilever (UL) announced plans to dramatically increase sales of plant-based meat and dairy alternatives as part of a new sustainability program designed to shrink the environmental footprint of its food brands. While the company targets $1.2 billion of plant-based foods and dairy alternatives over the next five to seven years, consensus revenue forecasts put the company’s 2023 revenue near $64.4 billion.

Despite Unilever’s good intentions, that context means less than 2% of its revenue in the coming years would be derived from plant-based foods and dairy alternatives. Under the Tematica scoring system that barely gives the company a low-level “1” score for our Sustainable Future of Food investing theme and index with Foxberry.

The Anglo-Dutch consumer goods giant said last week that it plans to sell more than $1.2 billion worth of plant-based foods and dairy alternatives within the next five to seven years, largely by boosting sales from its The Vegetarian Butcher brand and increasing the number of vegan alternatives across its extensive portfolio.

Unilever acquired plant-based meat company The Vegetarian Butcher in late 2018 and since has expanded the brand into more than 30 countries and secured a major supply deal for the firm’s vegan patties and nuggets with Burger King. In the same time frame, it has launched a number of vegan products for its most high profile brands, including Hellman’s, Magnum and Ben & Jerry’s.

“As one of the world’s largest food companies, we have a critical role to play in helping to transform the global food system,” said Hanneke Faber, president of Unilever’s food and refreshment division. “It’s not up to us to decide for people what they want to eat, but it is up to us to make healthier and plant-based options accessible to all. These are bold, stretching targets which demonstrate our commitment to being a force for good.”

 

Source: Unilever sets $1.2B sales target for meat and dairy alternatives | Greenbiz

Cocktail Investing Ep 5: M&A activity among Consumer Staples, fast food thematic signals, Fed-Speak, and what exactly is the Border Adjustment Tax (BAT)?

Cocktail Investing Ep 5: M&A activity among Consumer Staples, fast food thematic signals, Fed-Speak, and what exactly is the Border Adjustment Tax (BAT)?

In this week’s program, Tematica’s cocktail mixologists, Chris Versace and Lenore Hawkins sit down to discuss some of the week’s economic data, relevant political events and share where they have spotted a few of the latest Thematic Signals, such as:

  • What McDonald’s (MCD) soft drink promotional price cuts mean to our Cash Strapped Consumer
  • How the Connected Society is pushing UPS to up its game as online shoppers increasingly expect two-day shipping.
  • Major League Baseball looks to remain relevant in our Content is King world by potentially partnering with Facebook (FB), which in turn is placing its app on Apple TV (AAPL), as the way we consume content and connect with each other continues to evolve.

This week saw some telling moves in the M&A arena with Kraft (KHC) calling off its prematurely disclosed bid for Unilever (UL) as consumer staples companies such as JM Smucker (SJM) and General Mills (GIS) struggle — not exactly a robust sign for the economy despite what we see in the headlines. Others like Restaurant Brands (QSR) that are looking to buy growth get an agreement done with Popeye’s Louisiana Kitchen (PLKI), and we talk about the whys behind that strategic rationale.

Of course, this week we received the clear-as-mud minutes from the latest Federal Reserve’s Open Market Committee meeting, which we dig into as well as dish out the 411 on what this Border Adjustment Tax is all about and how it could affect you and the companies in which you invest.

The teflon market continues to push up as valuations get further into the stratosphere and forward EPS estimates get revised downward. We’ve now gone an unprecedented 8 years without a 20 percent correction and the VIX 65-day moving average has dropped down into territory that normally precedes a pullback. While we are optimistic when it comes to the economy, we have to acknowledge our Aging of the Population theme means the first baby boomers are turning 70 this year with 1.5 million doing so each year over the next 15 years, which will have a dramatic impact on spending as well as health care costs. That’s especially the case when only 50% of them have saved enough for retirement.

But with CEO’s of major U.S. manufacturers making the headlines that Trump is the most pro-business president since the founding fathers, stocks are holding up just fine… for now. More on that on the podcast. Listen now.

Companies mentioned on the Podcast

  • Amazon.com (AMZN)
  • Apple (APPL)
  • Campbell Soup (CPB)
  • Facebook (FB)
  • General Mills (GIS)
  • Houlihan Lokey (HLI)
  • JM Smucker (SJM)
  • Kraft Heinz (KHC)
  • Macy’s (M)
  • Major League Baseball
  • McDonald’s (MCD)
  • Nordstrom (JWN)
  • Popeyes Louisiana Kitchen (PLKI)
  • Restaurant Brands Intl (QSR)
  • Twitter (TWTR)
  • Unilever (UL)
  • United Parcel Service (UPS)
  • Whole Foods Market (WFM)

 

Lenore Hawkins Tematica Research Chief Macro Strategist
Chris Versace Tematica Research Founder and Chief Investment Officer