Kraft Heinz agrees to buy paleo company Primal Kitchen

Kraft Heinz agrees to buy paleo company Primal Kitchen

We have seen a growing number of food and beverage companies acquiring businesses to help reposition their offering to include healthy, natural and good for you food. Kraft Heinz is joining a group that includes Hershey, Kellogg, PepsiCo, and Coca-Cola among others as they look to rise the tailwinds associated with our Clean Living investing theme.

With the Kraft Heinz purchase of Primal Kitchen, we’d note the valuation of 4x sales, which helps explain why Kraft Heinz is also launching a venture arm, Springboard, that will work with food start-ups that we suspect will also be in tune with our Clean Living investing theme.

Kraft Heinz said Thursday it plans to buy paleo condiment and dressing company Primal Kitchen for about $200 million, as the ketchup maker looks for a platform to help compete against upstart brands.

Primal Kitchen is expected to generate about $50 million in revenue this year, Kraft Heinz said. The deal is expected to be completed in early 2019.

Primal Kitchen was founded by food blogger Mark Sisson, who started “Mark’s Daily Apple” in 2006 and has written a number of diet and exercise books. The company makes paleo-friendly products including mayo, avocado oil and dressings. It says its products are without processed or artificial ingredients, added sugars, soybean or canola oils.

Paleo diets focus on foods that were available in the Paleolithic era, like nuts, seeds, lean meats and vegetables. The idea, which has gained a strong following in recent years, is that the human body is best suited to eat the foods that early humans ate rather than the modern diet, which includes processed foods.

Kraft Heinz has begun to follow the playbook written by many of its peers seeking growth as eating habits change. For most Big Food companies, it is hard to duplicate the innovation and culture necessary to create the same success seen by younger brands like Kind Bar.

As such, Kraft Heinz joined other Big Food brands this year in launching a venture arm, Springboard, to partner with food start-ups.

Using Primal Kitchen as a platform would also echo a strategy that others have employed, to varying degrees of success. Kellogg has said it wants to use its $600 million acquisition of RXBar as a platform and Hershey is looking at its acquisition of Amplify Brands as a platform for its growing suite of snack brands.

Source: Kraft Heinz agrees to buy paleo mayo and dressing company Primal Kitchen

 Our Clean Living theme hitting Frappuccino sales at Starbucks

 Our Clean Living theme hitting Frappuccino sales at Starbucks

The war on sugar has hit companies like Hershey Foods (HSY), forcing it to pivot its snacking M&A strategy to better meet shifting consumer preferences for healthy, natural and organic snacks.

We’ve seen a prononced shift for waters and seltzers that is driving companies like National Beverage Corp. (FIZZ), home of LaCroix, and Cott Corp. (COT), a now pure play company on water, coffee, tea and filtration, as consumers increasingly reach less frequently for sugary sodas or ones that have artificial sweeteners.

In other words, Hershey, Coca-Cola (KO), PepsiCo (PEP) are contending with the headwind associated with our Clean Living investing theme, while National Beverage and Cott are rising the tailwind.

Now we are seeing consumers balk at the sugar laden Frappuccino that has become a staple at Starbucks (SBUX) complete with seasonal specialites. While this is the latest thorn in the side of Starbucks, it has the potential to not only hit it on the profit line but also force an accelerated re-think on its beverage and even its food offerings.

 

Frappuccino sales are struggling, and concerns about how much sugar the slushy drinks contain may be among the reasons.Starbucks says sales from the drinks that mix coffee, ice, syrup and milk are down 3 percent from a year ago, and is blaming the “health and wellness” trend for the dip.”These are oftentimes more indulgent beverages — higher in sugar, higher in calories,” Starbucks CEO Kevin Johnson said during a presentation to investors Tuesday.

A 16-ounce Cupcake Creme Frappuccino has 400 calories and 63 grams of sugar. A Triple Mocha Frappuccino has 390 calories and 51 grams of sugar. That’s with 2 percent milk and whipped cream.

Peter Saleh, restaurant analyst for BTIG, notes that interest in healthy eating isn’t new: “It’s not something that popped up out of nowhere.”

Another problem may simply be “people not wanting to consume full-price Frappuccinos…” A medium Frappuccino costs between $4 and $5. Exactly how many calories the drinks deliver varies.

Source: Starbucks claims Frappuccino sales down due to ‘health and wellness’ trend | Fox News