Everything You Need To Know About The Markets Today

Everything You Need To Know About The Markets Today

Markets in Asia struggled today to get any traction following yesterday’s lackluster markets in the US and the weakening data coming out of Europe. The European equity markets are mostly in the green (albeit only slightly) with the exception of the FTSE 100 which is slightly down as of mid-day trading.

The beleaguered Hong Kong stock exchange got a shot in the arm today as the initial public offering of AB InBev’s Asia Pacific business – Budweiser Brewing Company APAC Ltd (1876.HK) – raised $5 billion, the second largest IPO of the year behind Uber’s (UBER) $8.1 billion in May. The company had initially looked to raise closer to $10 billion two months ago but was forced to put the IPO on hold after investors balked at the price. That seems to be a growing trend these days.

Major events for the day will be… READ MORE HERE

Weekly Issue: Factors making the stock market melt up a head-scratcher

Weekly Issue: Factors making the stock market melt up a head-scratcher

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Tematica Investing: Thematic Tailwinds for 2019 and Scaling into AXON

Tematica Investing: Thematic Tailwinds for 2019 and Scaling into AXON

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Tematica Options+: A Thematic Look at 2019 and a New Option Trade

Tematica Options+: A Thematic Look at 2019 and a New Option Trade

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HTC’s AI, VR and blockchain applications only start in the healthcare sector

HTC’s AI, VR and blockchain applications only start in the healthcare sector

Long known as a smartphone company, as that market has become more competitive and as its market share has fallen, HTC has turned inwards to reposition itself as many companies have in the past and many very well could if not should in the future. Apple is focused on growing its subscription and services businesses, while Disney is entering the direct to consumer streaming market for its content. HTC has embraced several aspects of our Disruptive Innovation investing theme, including artificial intelligence, virtual and augmented reality and blockchain, to pivot more towards the education and training markets.

HTC’s first inroads have been in the healthcare sector, which is already changing to not only meet the needs of our Aging of the Population investing theme, but it is also contending with the intersection of our Digital Lifestyle and Digital Infrastructure ones as well in the form of telemedicine. That’s just one example that showcases how healthcare is on the cusp of dramatic change, and there are other Signals to confirm this.

As these and other innovations are embraced by the healthcare industry, odds are we will see a dramatic shift in how our healthcare is administered just like the ones we’ve seen in how we shop, communicate and consume content. As that takes hold, and the costs benefits begin to be realized, the potential to spread across other education and training applications rises. We’re already seeing Boeing and others test augmented reality on the factory floor.

From a selfish perspective, hopefully, HTC’s success means this also means the end of sitting in a waiting room for what seems like eons until one’s name is called.

 

HTC’s efforts in developing AI technologies and platforms for healthcare and other applications have paid off significantly, with its DeepQ AI platform already utilized by hospitals to support diagnosis and VR-aided surgery and by universities for education and training purposes. The company is also actively developing blockchain-based platforms for healthcare applications, according to Edward Chang, president of HTC’s healthcare division.

He revealed that the platform has been adopted by Taipei Medical University Hospital, Mackay Memorial Hospital and Taipei Municipal Wanfang Hospital for diagnosis instructions, personal medicine, patient registration advices, medication monitoring, disease prevention and vaccination services.

The DeepQ platform can also be applied to accelerate AI training and optimize AI application patterns to lower the time and cost for developing AI applications, Chang indicated, adding that top Taiwan universities have incorporated the platform into their AI education programs.

In terms of healthcare VR applications, HTC has launched Vivepaper, surgical theater and 3D organon services. Among them, Vivepaper is an AR product designed to support immersive augmented reality experiences for education, training and entertainment through media contents including graphics, videos, and music, Chang revealed.

The firm’s surgical theater can combine diverse medical equipment such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) instruments to recompose 3D patterns, and can also go with VR to help surgeons work out optimal surgical training programs.

HTC healthcare division is also developing blockchain-based healthcare application platform, with the first platform, dubbed DeeplinQ, set to be launched in 2019. The platform can also be applied to privacy management at social networks and to smart contracts, according to Chang.

Source: HTC revving up AI, blockchain applications to healthcare sector

Weekly Issue: A Number of Our Thematic Leaders Well Positioned for the Holidays

Weekly Issue: A Number of Our Thematic Leaders Well Positioned for the Holidays

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WEEKLY ISSUE: Confirming Data Points for Apple and Universal Display

WEEKLY ISSUE: Confirming Data Points for Apple and Universal Display

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Facebook’s Watch get the international treatment and amps the content arms race

Facebook’s Watch get the international treatment and amps the content arms race

Over the last few quarters, we’ve seen a growing number of streaming content services come to market to challenge the success had by Netflix and to a lesser extent Amazon’s Prime Video. And the new entrants are from over given the pending launch of Disney’s Disney Play, AT&T/Time Warner’s DC Universe, Walmart’s Vudu and of course the highly anticipated one from Apple. Core essentials include a wide array of original programming and a global reach, which is a twin focus at Netflix and increasingly Amazon.

It comes as little surprise then that Facebook is now expanding the reach of its Watch streaming video service to “everywhere” offering a global reach to its content partners and of course it advertising ones as well. The question is given the growing privacy concerns, will Watch help Facebook reinvigorate its stickiness in the US and other markets but drive average revenue per user outside of the US as well?

As we get the answer to that question, we continue to see a global content arms race that runs the risk of diluting the content offering as the streaming video service markets become increasingly crowded. If we’re right, it could be a repeat of cable TV channels, just not on your TV.

Facebook has announced the international rollout of Facebook Watch, its video destination for episodic content, which first launched in the U.S. a year ago this month. The social media giant said Wednesday that the VOD service would be “available everywhere” from Thursday, giving publishers and content creators a worldwide market for their videos.

“With the global launch of Watch, we are supporting publishers and creators globally in two critical areas: helping them to make money from their videos on Facebook and better understand how their content is performing,” the company said in a statement.

Watch launched in the U.S. in August 2017 with the goal of offering users a place on Facebook to discover shows and video creators and to start conversations with friends, other fans and even the creators themselves. The company said that, since the launch, it had made the experience more social, including making it easier to see which videos friends have liked or shared, and creating shows with audience participation at their core. In June, Facebook said it would  launch a slate of new shows boasting interactive features such as polls and quizzes to fulfill the platform’s goal of fostering a sense of community between creators and users.

Taking Watch global would also create new opportunities for content creators as the service expanded its video Ad Breaks program to enable more partners to monetize their videos, the company said. The Ad Breaks service officially launches Thursday in the U.K., Ireland, Australia and New Zealand, in addition to the U.S. It will launch in another 21 countries in September, including France, Germany, Spain, Argentina, Colombia, El Salvador, Guatemala, and Thailand. Facebook said the service would support both English-language content and content in various local languages. Further countries and language will be added in the coming months.

The company said it had lowered the threshold for publishers and creators to be eligible to make money from their videos. Those creating three-minute videos that have 10,000 followers, generate more than 30,000 one-minute views within a two-month period, or meet Facebook’s monetization eligibility standards would qualify.

Source: Facebook Watch Rolls Out Internationally – Variety