The greying of America’s workforce runs the risk of inflation?

The greying of America’s workforce runs the risk of inflation?

We here at Tematica have been discussing the growing number of headwinds to the global economy, but one that even we have not zeroed in on is a somewhat hidden cost associated with our Aging of the Population investing theme. We know people are living longer than ever before, which means they either need to either amass more retirement savings or they will be working longer lest they fall victim to the downside of our Middle-class Squeeze investing theme. In some cases, would be retirees may want to work longer to remain active as well as get paid and keep health benefits.

There are two headwinds associated with this. First, the longer working time frame limits the number of jobs, particularly non-entry level ones, that in the past would have opened up to other workers. Second, older workers tend to drive up the cost of wages and benefits, which means companies potentially face a wave of higher expenses in the coming years. To combat that pressure and keep delivering on the bottom line to shareholders, we could see price increases become the norm in the next coming years… just as the Federal Reserve is re-thinking its inflation target.

America’s workforce is getting grayer by the second, a phenomenon that some employers regard as a competitive disadvantage: older workers drive up the cost of wages and benefits, and can impede the progress of younger workers—or so the conventional thinking goes.

People age 55 and older are expected to make up a quarter of the U.S. workforce by 2026, and the number of workers ages 65 to 74 is projected to grow by 4.2% a year between 2016 and 2026—versus just 0.6% for the workforce overall.

While more people are staying on the job longer because they haven’t saved enough to retire, many older workers are extending their careers by choice. “More people want to work longer because they’re living longer,” says Steve Vernon, a consulting research scholar at the Stanford Center on Longevity and author of Retirement Game-Changers.

Source: Perks for Older Workers Are the Next Big Workplace Trend – Barron’s

Weekly Issue: Looking Around the Bend of the Current Rebound Rally

Weekly Issue: Looking Around the Bend of the Current Rebound Rally

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WEEKLY ISSUE: Confirming Data Points for Apple and Universal Display

WEEKLY ISSUE: Confirming Data Points for Apple and Universal Display

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A Middle-class Squeeze recipe: Flat real wage growth with prices poised to move higher

A Middle-class Squeeze recipe: Flat real wage growth with prices poised to move higher

We’ve been witnessing inflationary pressures in the monthly economic data over the last several months. Some of this has been higher raw material due in part to trade tariffs and other input costs, such as climbing freight costs, as well as the impact of increased minimum wages in certain states. Habit Restaurant (HABT) noticeably called out the impact of wage gains as one of the primary drivers in its recent menu price increase.

This June 2018 earnings season, we’ve heard from a growing number of companies – from materials and food to semiconductor and restaurants –  that contending with inflationary pressures are looking to pass it through to consumers in the form of higher prices as best they can. The thing is, wage growth has been elusive for the vast majority of workers, especially on an inflation-adjusted basis. Keep in mind that is before we factor in the inflationary effect to be had if these escalating rounds of trade tariffs are in effect longer than expected.

As these price increases take hold and interest rates creep higher, it means consumer spending dollars will not stretch as far as they did previously.  Not good for consumers and not good for the economy but it offers support for the Fed to boost rates in the coming quarters and keeps our Middle-Class Squeeze investing theme in vogue.

 

U.S. average hourly earnings adjusted for inflation fell 0.2 percent in July from a year earlier, data released on Friday showed, notching the lowest reading since 2012. While inflation isn’t high in historical terms, after years of being too low following the 2007-2009 recession, its recent gains are taking a bigger bite out of U.S. paychecks.

“Inflation has been climbing and wage growth, meanwhile, has been flat as a pancake,” said Laura Rosner, senior economist at MacroPolicy Perspectives LLC in New York. “In a very tight labor market you would expect that workers would negotiate their wages to at least keep up with the cost of living, and the picture tells you that they’re not.”

Source: American Workers Just Got a Pay Cut in Economy Trump Calls Great – Bloomberg

Silver Screen

Coming soon to theaters: higher prices. Movie theater operator Cinemark Holdings Inc. plans to pass costs along to customers, partly due to seating upgrades.

“Our average ticket price also increased 3.7 percent to $8.08, largely as a result of inflation, incremental pricing opportunities associated with recliner conversions, and favorable adult-versus-child ticket type mix,” said Chief Financial Officer Sean Gamble. “As we’ve continued to roll out recliners, our general tactic has been to go forward with limited pricing upfront and then when we see the demand opportunity increase there, and I’d say there’s still — we still believe there is further opportunity as we look to the back half of this year and forward in that regard.”

To be fair, movie ticket prices have been marching steadily higher in recent years. But theaters aren’t the only ones planning to pass on costs.

Sugar Boost

The maker of Twinkies and Ding Dongs wants to charge more for its sugary snacks.

“We will implement a retail price increase and incremental retailer programs to help offset the inflationary headwinds we and others in the industry are experiencing,” Hostess Brands Inc. Chief Executive Officer Andrew Callahan said on a call, explaining that the company is researching how to do so without choking off growth. The majority of the change will come in 2019, he said.

Bubble Wrap

Sealed Air Corp., the maker of Bubble Wrap and other packaging materials, is trying “to do everything we can operationally to keep our freight costs low,” Chief Financial Officer William Stiehl said in apresentation. “Where I’ve been very happy with the company’s success is our ability to pass along price increases to our customers for our relevant input cost.”

Steel Prices

Tariffs are hitting home at Otter Tail Corp.’s metal fabrication unit BTD, but leadership doesn’t sound especially concerned. Thank pricing power.

“We do not anticipate higher steel prices from tariffs having a significant impact on BTD’s margins as steel costs are largely passed through to customers,” Chief Executive Officer Charles MacFarlane said on a call. “BTD is working to enhance productivity in a period of increased volume and tight labor markets.”

Tariff Tag

The trade impact pass-through is equally real at semiconductor device maker Diodes Inc.

“Products that we import into the U.S. from China, all of those products are going to be ultimately affected by the tariffs,” Chief Financial Officer Richard White said on a call. Between U.S. levies that began July 6 and additional rounds planned to follow, “it’s about $3.6 million per quarter, but we plan to pass these tariff charges on to our customers.”

Home Costs

Housing developer LGI Homes Inc. is “consistently” seeing sales price increases as costs bump higher — a sign that pricing power exists even in big-ticket markets like housing.

“We’re able to and need to raise our prices to keep our gross margins consistent,” Chairman Eric Lipar said on a call. “In the market that we’re in, which I’d characterize as a good, solid, strong demand market with a tight supply of houses and the labor challenges, the material challenges that we all face, we see at least for the next couple quarters, that trend continuing. Prices are going to have to increase on a same-store basis if you will in order to offset increased costs.”

“We’re dealing with a higher monthly payment for the buyer now because of the rising interest rates from nine months ago. Demand seems to be there,” he said, adding that the company may need to examine ways to address the situation. “Rather than reducing the price, we may have to look at smaller square footages. The buyer may have to choose.”

People Problems

Not everyone is finding opportunities to pass along costs: Civitas Solutions Inc., a health and human services provider that caters to those with disabilities and youth with behavioral or medical challenges, is seeing slimmer margins.

“The number of people that are exiting the company are still a concern to us and I think it’s driven largely by the full, robust economy,” Chairman Bruce Nardella said on a call, citing workers seeing opportunities to leave to get higher wages. “Over the last two years, our margins have eroded because of that labor pressure.”

Pizza Pain

As if a leadership feud and sales slump weren’t problematic enough, pizza chain Papa John’s International Inc. also has to deal with wage pressures and rising costs. It’s responding by attempting to eke out efficiency gains, rather than by raising prices, to defend its margins.

“We have employed third party efficiency experts to review the potential for improvements within our restaurants,” Chief Executive Officer Steve Ritchie said on a call. “They are also conducting time and motion studies. Their work will directly supplement the work we are doing within our restaurant design of the future.”

Addressing Pressures

As some companies maintain profits by pushing costs to customers, Flowers Foods Inc., the maker of Tastykake pastries and Mi Casa tortillas, is finding work-arounds. It increased prices in the first quarter to help offset input inflation, but has also eaten some of the cost.

“Our margins were impacted by inflationary pressures from higher transportation cost, a tight labor market, and increasingly volatile commodity markets,” Chief Executive Officer Allen Shiver said on a call. “To address these inflationary pressures, we are aggressively working to capture greater efficiencies and cost reductions.”

 

Source: Inflation Is Coming to Theater Near You as U.S. Companies Flex Pricing Power – Bloomberg

US Housing market plauged by lack of housing supply and capable buyers as prices climb

US Housing market plauged by lack of housing supply and capable buyers as prices climb

Tematica’s Chief Macro Strategist Lenore Hawkins has been rather vocal on the two issues hitting the domestic housing market – a lack of supply and escalating prices that are shrinking the pool of potential buyers.

While one would think homebuilders would respond with more affordable housing, they are also contending with increases to their own cost structure as commodity prices for steel, aluminum, copper and lumber rise. Some of that increase can be traced back to tariff and trade talks, but given limited supply of these materials there is also the Rise of the New Middle Class factor as well.

Usually when there is a paint point such as this, there is or tends to be an eventual solution. This has and will hold true as well, but it likely means the housing multiplier effect on the economy won’t be what it was in the past… and that’s not counting the demographic impact to be had associated with our Aging of the Population investing theme.

Lest I forget, prospects for continued housing price increases will add wood to the inflation hawk fire. Team Tematica will be looking for signs of this not only in the regular data we watch, but also in the Fed’s comments.

 

After losing over a third of their value a decade ago, which led to the financial crisis and a deep recession, U.S. house prices have regained those losses.

But supply has not been able to keep up with rising demand, making homeownership less affordable.

Annual average earnings growth has remained below 3 percent even as house price rises have averaged more than 5 percent over the last few years.

The latest poll of nearly 45 analysts taken May 16-June 5 showed the S&P/Case Shiller composite index of home prices in 20 cities is expected to gain a further 5.7 percent this year.

That compared to predictions for average earnings growth of 2.8 percent and inflation of 2.5 percent 2018, according to a separate Reuters poll of economists. [ECILT/US]U.S. house prices are then forecast to rise 4.3 percent next year and 3.6 percent in 2020.

A further breakdown of the April data showed the inventory of existing homes had declined for 35 straight months on an annual basis while the median house price was up for a 74th consecutive month.

Source: U.S. house prices to rise at twice the speed of inflation and pay: Reuters poll | Reuters

Tematica’s take on the Fed’s monetary policy statement today

Tematica’s take on the Fed’s monetary policy statement today

As expected the Federal Reserve boosted interest rates by one-quarter point putting the target range for the Fed Funds rate to 1-1/2 to 1-3/4 percent. As expected the focus was the Fed’s updated economic projections, and what we saw was a step up in growth expectations this year and in 2019, a step down in the Unemployment Rate this year and next, and no major changes in the Fed’s inflation expectations. Alongside those changes, the Fed also boosted its interest rate hike expectations in 2019 and 2020, by a

Putting all of this into the Fed decoder ring, this suggests the Fed sees the economy on stronger footing than it did in December, which is interesting given the recent rollover in the Citibank Economic Surprise Index (CESI) that is offset by initial March economic data. Even the Fed noted, “Recent data suggest that growth rates of household spending and business fixed investment have moderated from their strong fourth-quarter readings.”

Stepping back and look at the changes in the Fed’s economic forecast – better growth, employment and no prick up in inflation – it seems pretty Goldilocks on its face if you ask me, but the prize goes to Lenore, who called for the Fed to be more hawkish than dovish exiting today’s FOMC meeting. We’ll see in the coming months if forecast becomes fact. As we get more economic data in the coming months, we can expect hawkish viewers to bang the 4thrate hike drum and that means we’ll be back in Fed watching Groundhog Day mode before too long.

While the Fed and the OECD are predicting a synchronized global economic acceleration in 2018, the ECRI, (which accurately forecast the 2017 acceleration) is calling for a synchronized deceleration. We suspect that too much is expected of the impact of the tax cuts and too little is being accounted for from potential trade wars and the shifts in monetary policy.

The Fed has at least 2 more rate hikes planned, which will give us a 200 bps increase in total, the consequence of which will only be felt with a significant lag. We are also getting a roughly 100 basis point equivalent tightening from the Fed’s tapering program, which brings us to 300 basis points of tightening. That is twice the magnitude of tightening pre-1987 market collapse, equivalent to the 1994 tightening that broke Orange County and Mexico and more than what preceded the 1998 Asian crisis and the 2001 dot-com bust.

Now for Fed Chairman Powell’s first Fed news conference…