Cisco warns  massive 9.8/10-severity security hole

Cisco warns  massive 9.8/10-severity security hole

Lest we fall into a sense of false security given the lack of a high profile cyber attack in recent months, we have a new warning from Cisco over the need to patch a vulnerability in their hardware. A solid reminder that the demand drivers for our  Safety & Security investing theme come in all shapes and sizes.

Cisco is warning businesses that use its wireless VPN and firewall routers to install updates immediately due to a critical flaw that remote attackers can exploit to break into a network.

The vulnerability allows any attacker with any browser to execute code of their choice via the web interface used for managing Cisco RV110W Wireless-N VPN Firewall, Cisco RV130W Wireless-N Multifunction VPN Router, and Cisco RV215W Wireless-N VPN Router.

The networking giant has assigned the bug, tagged as CVE-2019-1663, with a severity score of 9.8 out of a possible 10 under the Common Vulnerability Scoring System (CVSS).

Cisco’s developers failed to ensure the web app properly checks data that users type into the routers’ management interface, which could give an attacker control of the operating system.

Source: Cisco: Patch routers now against massive 9.8/10-severity security hole | ZDNet

By 2022 Cisco predicts nearly 5 zettabytes of IP traffic per year 

By 2022 Cisco predicts nearly 5 zettabytes of IP traffic per year 

Over the last several years, we’ve seen an explosion in the number of connected devices people use. While the digital hub remains the smartphone, the growing number of tablets, e-readers, wearables, smart speakers and digital assistants, and various Connected Home applications have led to a surge in data traffic. With the deployment of 5G wireless technology beginning next year and going mainstream in 2020 alongside gigabit internet, we will see yet another explosion in data consumption as the Internet of Things (IoT), Machine to Machine (M2M) and other applications go from beta testing to commercial deployments.

As far as how much data will be created, Cisco Systems says more traffic will be created in 2022 than in the first 32 years since the internet started. That’s a powerful tailwind for our Digital Infrastructure investing theme that is being led by our Digital Lifestyle and Disruptive Innovators investing themes.

Cisco foresees a massive buildup of IP traffic – 4.8 zettabytes per year by 2022, which is over three times the 2017 rate – lead by the increased use of IoT device traffic, video, and sheer number of new users coming onboard.

The company also says there will be 4.8 billion internet users by 2022, up from 3.4 billion in 2017. Those predictions are from Cisco’s Visual Networking Index (VNI), its annual look at the state of the internet culled from actual network traffic reports and independent analyst forecasts.

Cisco says that since 1984, over 4.7 zettabytes of IP traffic have flowed across networks, but that’s just a hint of what’s coming. By 2022, more IP traffic will cross global networks than in all prior “internet years” combined up to the end of 2016. In other words, more traffic will be created in 2022 than in the first 32 years since the internet started, Cisco says. (Remember, too, that an exabyte is 1 billion gigabytes and a zettabyte is a thousand exabytes.)

One of the more telling facts of the new VNI is the explosion of machine-to-machine (M2M) and Internet of Things (IoT) traffic. For example M2M modules account for 3.1 percent of IP traffic in 2017, but will be 6.4 percent of IP traffic by 2022, said Thomas Barnett, director of service provider thought leadership at Cisco. By 2022, M2M connections will be 51 percent of the total devices and connections on the internet.

Source: Cisco predicts nearly 5 zettabytes of IP traffic per year by 2022 | Network World

“Dragonfly” hackers target U.S. energy company networks

“Dragonfly” hackers target U.S. energy company networks

From time to time, we are reminded of the growing threat of cyber attacks, one of the downsides of our increasingly Connected Society. This attack on computer networks of U.S. energy companies speaks to risks associated with the “industrialization of the internet” better known as the internet of things as part of our Safety & Security investing theme. These attacks and others like them suggest continued spending on cyber security from a widening group of companies that bode well for companies like Fortinet (FTNT), Palo Alto Networks (PAWN), Cisco Systems (CSCO) and other similar companies.

Symantec, a major cyber firm, says in a new report that hackers codenamed “Dragonfly” have been able to infiltrate energy sector computer networks with malicious emails, so-called “watering hole” attacks, and “Trojanized” software. The hackers – who according to Symantec have ties to the Russian government – may have compromised more than a dozen American companies in recent months.

“Dragonfly” has been linked to the Russian government by some cyber security experts but Symantec has not publicly blamed Russia.

The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) told CBS News that they are looking into the matter.

Source: Major cyber firm says hackers are targeting U.S. energy – CBS News

Smartphone data usage to climb to 8.9 GB per month by 2021, driving demand for Connected Society companies

Smartphone data usage to climb to 8.9 GB per month by 2021, driving demand for Connected Society companies

No slowdown expected in mobile data consumption as more smartphones are sold and carriers deploy faster mobile networks globally. A rather compelling view for our Connected Society and its going global. Implication for smartphone vendors, RF chip companies, mobile infrastructure equipment and many more as newer mobile technologies are deployed.

According to the recently published Ericsson Mobility Report, the average smartphone user in 2021 is projected to churn through 8.9 GB of data every single month. In contrast, the average smartphone user today uses about 1.4 GB of data every month. This increase, the report notes, will result from an increase in the number of smartphones in use along with a broader 4G LTE coverage. Also worth noting is that some carriers will begin rolling out support for 5G speeds by 2020.

Source: Smartphone data usage to climb to 8.9 GB per month by 2021 | BGR