Doubling Down on Digital Infrastructure Thematic Leader

Doubling Down on Digital Infrastructure Thematic Leader

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Adding two Middle-class Squeeze call option positions ahead of earnings this week

Adding two Middle-class Squeeze call option positions ahead of earnings this week

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Weekly Issue: The Changing Mood of the Market

Weekly Issue: The Changing Mood of the Market

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Rising consumer credit card debt to be a headwind to GDP in 2018

We are starting to get not only holiday sales results from the likes of Kohl’s (KSS) and others, but also December same-store-sales results from Tematica Investing Select List resident Costco Wholesale (COST) and its retail brethren. Thus far the results are positive and in some cases much better than expected, but when we see we think about the other shoe to drop. In this case, that is “How are consumers paying for all of this given that wages barely budged in 2017?” 

The answer is they have been turning to their credit cards. Before the holidays began, the Federal Reserve found consumer credit card debt hit $808 billion exiting September. Now let’s add findings from MagnifyMoney that “people who used credit cards for holiday purchases charged an average of $1,054, about 5%  more than last year.” This helps support the view that consumer credit card debt will eclipse $1 trillion this year.

For us here at Tematica, it’s more reason to think consumers, especially Cash-Strapped Consumers, are likely to use the benefits of tax reform to get their financial houses in order, pay down debt and spend less than the Wall Street herd is thinking. In other words, we see this supporting views that were laid out by Chris Versace and Lenore Hawkins on last week’s Cocktail Investing podcast, and that’s before we factor in potential Fed rate hikes this year.

 

“The scary number — $1 trillion — we’ll definitely hit in 2018,” said Jill Gonzalez, an analyst with WalletHub. “It seems to say a lot of American consumers did not learn their lesson from the recession and are returning to living beyond their means.”

Credit card debt stood at $808 billion on Sept. 30, the end of the third quarter, according to the most recent data from the Federal Reserve Bank of New York. That’s $280 billion more than the previous high hit in 2008, at the height of the financial crisis that led to the Great Recession.

As consumers keep spending away on their credit cards — which typically come with interest rates starting at about 16 percent — the Federal Reserve is expected to have two or three quarter-point hikes this year to a key rate that affects consumer debt. It did so three times in 2017.”Every time there is a Federal Reserve rate hike, that adds about $1.5 billion to our collective financing rates,” Gonzalez said. “That has to do with these delinquency rates rising. And when you factor in mortgages, student loans and auto loans, that becomes a scary picture.”

Source: How to knock out holiday credit card debt

Growing focus on Amazon’s private label potential

Growing focus on Amazon’s private label potential

During the summer, we here at Tematica spoke at length on the growing number of private label products and brands at Amazon (AMZN). Having seen the strategy work at a number of other retailers, like Costco Wholesale (COST), Kohl’s (KSS), Wal-Mart (WMT) and even JC Penny (JCP), we see it as “expected” that Amazon would seek to grab a greater slice of profits to be had by offering its own products.

Today, Amazon boasts 34 private label brands in nine categories, and more across Wall Street are starting to realize this is bound to be something far greater than small potatoes or a rounding error for Amazon. Now we’re wondering how long until they realize our Connected Society, Cash-Strapped Consumer and Rise & Fall of the Middle-Class themes are some of the meaningful tailwinds behind this?

 

In recent Amazon news, an analyst from financial firm Morgan Stanley has predicted the eCommerce platform’s private label retail sales could provide an added boost to its bottom lines.

According to a Barrons.com article published Tuesday (Oct. 10), analyst Brian Nowak has speculated that Amazon’s private label merchandise sales could add $1 billion to Amazon’s bottom line, making up 5 percent of retail sales by 2019.“… for Amazon, it’s all about gross profit dollars: advertising, subscriptions, services … and now private label …” Brian Nowak said.

“We believe it is increasingly important to focus on Amazon’s gross profit dollar drivers. A deepening gross profit pool gives Amazon more dollars to invest and [eventually] allows [funds] to flow down to P&L for shareholders.

”Amazon’s private label goods first launched in 2009 and include thousands of products in a wide range of categories, such as clothing, electronics, industrial supplies and more, the Barrons.com article reported.

“Private label is likely to be the next driver … as our sensitivity shows that even if private label could grow to 5 percent of Amazon’s retail sales by 2019, it would add almost $1 billion of gross profit,” the Morgan Stanley analyst said.

Amazon currently boasts 34 private label brands in nine categories. Private label products are responsible for 0.15 percent of its global merchandise sales. Other major retailers see an average of 18 percent of gross merchandise sales coming from private label profits, Barrons.com reported. For example, Costco gets 20 percent of its revenue from private labels, JCPenney sees 44 percent, Kohl’s gets 46 percent and Walmart sees 15 percent, the article noted.

Source: Private Label Boosts Amazon’s Retail Sales | PYMNTS.com